Enthusiastic welcome for Peel's new RNLI lifeboat

Lifeboats News Release

Hundreds of well-wishers welcomed Peel's new RNLI Shannon class all-weather lifeboat - Frank and Brenda Winter - to its home station this past weekend

Dave Corkish

As Lifeboat 13-35 arrives in Peel crew acknowledge the waiting crowds


Peel’s coxswain for the Shannon’s passage from Poole to the Isle of Man, Jon Corlett, said:

‘I was a little emotional to see so many people along the shore and breakwater waiting for us after what had been an especially challenging journey. Clearly, the Isle of Man has a great affection for the RNLI.’

With Jon on the passage was Station Mechanic Ciaran Cain and volunteer crew members Juan Owens, Jason Spooner and Matt Corlett.

Peel RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Allen Corlett added:

‘It was a moving and unforgettable spectacle. Our new lifeboat - the first Shannon to be stationed in the Isle of Man by the RNLI - arrived accompanied by RNLI lifeboats from Port St Mary, Port Erin and our current relief lifeboat, along with our former Mersey class lifeboat, Ruby Clery, which is now based in Ramsey.

Describing the merits of the Shannon, Allen said:

‘The £2.2 million Shannon is the most advanced lifeboat in the RNLI fleet and will improve the crew’s ability to save lives at sea. It is more manoeuvrable, safer, faster and has a greater range than the Mersey class lifeboat it replaces.

‘One of the key innovations of the Shannon is its jet propulsion system. With the usual propellers and rudders replaced by water jets the lifeboat can turn in its own length, navigate around hazards and stop almost instantly. The crew was able to demonstrate these remarkable capabilities to an appreciative audience during displays by the breakwater and in Peel Bay.’

The Shannon is designed to keep the crew safer on shouts. Shock-absorbing seats protect them from impact when powering through waves. An improved Systems and Information Management System allows the crew to operate and monitor the lifeboat’s functions from the safety of their seats.

Allen thanked the many people who help the RNLI save lives at sea:

‘First, I must thank the passage crew for their determination in challenging conditions to bring the Shannon home as expected at 13.35, a time that reflects the lifeboat’s unique operational number. As always, we are grateful for the dedication of fundraisers and the generosity of supporters who make it possible for crews here and around the UK and Ireland to have essential training and vital new equipment. We couldn’t continue our life-saving work without their support.’

Newly introduced measures to control the potential spread of coronavirus will mean that training on the new lifeboat will be limited and it could be some time before it can be put into service. But until then, the public can be assured that Peel’s crew members will continue to respond to emergencies, using the relief Mersey class lifeboat Mary Margaret.

Renovations to the boathouse and improvements to the slipway are still underway and it is hoped they can be completed soon.

Ends

RNLI media contacts

For more information please telephone Carol Hunter MCIPR, RNLI Peel Lifeboat Press Officer on 07624461213 or carolhunter@manx.net

RNLI online

For more information on the RNLI please visit rnli.org. News releases and other media resources, including RSS feeds, downloadable photos and video, are available at the RNLI News Centre rnli.org/news-and-media.

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Ireland. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. There are five lifeboat stations on the Isle of Man.

The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,200 lives.

Tony Lloyd Davies

A spectacular sight! Five lifeboats in Peel Bay

Dan Chambers

Crew demonstrating an emergency stop for the crowds

Key facts about the RNLI

The RNLI charity saves lives at sea. Its volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service around the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland coasts. The RNLI operates over 238 lifeboat stations in the UK and Ireland and more than 240 lifeguard units on beaches around the UK and Channel Islands. The RNLI is independent of Coastguard and government and depends on voluntary donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824, its lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,700 lives.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 (UK) or 1800 991802 (Ireland) or by email.

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