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Tobermory RNLI volunteer Nick Ray completes epic Three Peaks by kayak

Lifeboats News Release

Tobermory RNLI fundraising volunteer and Deputy Launching Authority, Nick Ray has just completed the Three Peaks Challenge with a difference – he kayaked more than 500 miles between them.

Nick Ray during his epic Three Peaks Challenge

RNLI/Nick Ray

Nick Ray during his epic Three Peaks Challenge

Experienced sea kayaker Nick set off from Loch Eil close to Fort William on 15th May and paddled 518 miles to climb the three peaks of Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon, finishing just under a month later in Aberdovey on 10th June. The ‘three peaks challenge’ is so called as they are the highest mountains in Scotland, England and Wales respectively. Nick is raising money for Odyssey, a charity which provides adventurous, life enhancing experiences to people recovering from cancer.

Nick also cycled and walked just over 80 miles during his challenge. Nick’s longest day of kayaking was 53 miles when he paddled for 15 hours non stop. He frequently started in the very early hours to take account of the tide and weather. Nick also carried a Tobermory RNLI lifeboat bear to present to Aberdovey RNLI lifeboat station at the end of his epic journey.

Nick is no stranger to adventure. He is a highly experienced sea kayaker and in 2015 he kayaked around the Scottish coastline visiting all 47 lifeboat stations, a journey of more than 2000 miles, raising more than £4000 for the charity which saves lives at sea in the process. Last September, Nick completed an islands peak challenge involving a solo sea kayak journey of 180 miles from Oban to Troon, including climbing the island peaks of Ben More on Mull, the Paps on the Isle of Jura and Goat Fell on Arran.

Tobermory RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, Dr Sam Jones said: ‘This is a truly epic achievement by Nick and everyone on the crew has been following his progress. But aside from his intrepid adventures, we’re also grateful to Nick for the assistance which he gives us in training by helping the crew to familiarise themselves with a variety of kayak scenarios. We’re very much looking forward to welcoming him home.’

Notes to editors

For further information, please contact Dr Sam Jones, Tobermory RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager on 07747601900 or Gemma Macdonald, Regional Media Officer for Scotland on 07826 900639.

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The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

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