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RNLI Kessock rescue 8 people and launch on their 700th shout

Lifeboats News Release

The volunteer crew of RNLI Kessock have today (Sunday 3 June) rescued 8 people in 2 different shouts. Coming just days before the crew mark the 25th Anniversary of the station being formed, the second shout was the 700th time that RNLI volunteers have launched on service from North Kessock.

RNLI Kessock

RNLI Kessock returns the 4m RIB with engine failure to North Kessock slipway

The first shout of the day came when the UK Coastguard requested the lifeboat was launched at 3.40pm this afternoon after a 4m RIB (Rigid-hulled Inflatable Boat) suffered engine failure just to the east of the South Kessock slipway.

Quickly launching the volunteer crew were on scene in a matter of minutes as the casualty vessel was less then half a mile from the lifeboat station.

There were 4 people on board the RIB, all of whom were wearing lifejackets or buoyancy aids. They were taken under tow by the lifeboat crew and taken the very short distance across the Kessock Channel to the slipway at North Kessock where they originally launched from earlier in the day.

The wind was coming from the north east and was force 3, a gentle 8 -12 mph breeze. It was high tide.

Safely in North Kessock, the RNLI volunteers along with Inverness Coastguard team helped recover the RIB onto the trailer.

The crew were then stood down from the shout and returned to the lifeboat station to recover the lifeboat and make it ready for the next service call, whenever that might be.

That call came less than 2 hours after the volunteers headed home when their pagers were sounded again at 6.50pm.

This was to be the 700th shout for RNLI volunteers based in North Kessock over the past 25 years.

A small 4.5m cruiser had set off for a day’s fishing again with 4 people on board, all of whom were wearing buoyancy aids, it also suffered engine failure. This time caused by suspected fuel contamination.

By now the wind had increased to a force 4 gusting 5, 19-24 mph and the tide was ebbing, leading to choppy sea conditions caused by wind over tide. Visibility was about 3 miles.

The cruiser was located near Chanonry Point and taken under tow by the lifeboat who then turned into the worsening conditions to head back to Inverness Marina.

The tow took approximately 90 minutes and at times near the Meikle Mee buoy encountered 2.5m swells due to the wind over tide conditions.

The cruiser was safely secured in Inverness Marina around 9.30pm, again with the assistance of Inverness Coastguard team. The lifeboat crew returned to the station again to wash the lifeboat down, refuel it and make it ready for service.

Dan Holland, volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer for RNLI Kessock said: ‘Despite this being a busy afternoon for us, we were pleased to see that all 8 people we rescued today were wearing lifejackets or buoyancy aids and had good means of calling for help with them. Coming just days before the 25th anniversary of a RNLI lifeboat being based in North Kessock hopefully this successful outcome for all involved can be used to show the importance of being correctly prepared when you go to sea’

ENDS

Attached pictures:

RNLI Kessock RIB at North Kessock Slipway – the RIB involved in the first shout of the afternoon. Credit: RNLI Kessock

The empty carriage – Credit: Jack Lowe

2nd Shout cruiser under tow. Credit: RNLI Kessock

Media Contacts:

Dan Holland, Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer, RNLI Kessock, 07900 567 496 dnjholland@me.com

Henry Weaver, RNLI Regional Media Manager for Scotland, 01738 642946, 07771 943026, henry_weaver@rnli.org.uk

Gemma Mcdonald, RNLI Regional Media Officer for Scotland. 01738 642956, 07826 900639 Gemma_mcdonald@rnli.org.uk

RNLI 24 hour Press Office, 01202 336789

RNLI Kessock

Cruiser under alongside tow with Kessock lifeboat

RNLI/Jack Lowe

The launch and recovery rig at RNLI Kessock sits empty waiting for the lifeboat crew to return

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

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Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

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The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland