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Former Poole lifeboat to retire in the city that made it possible

Lifeboats News Release

Today retired City of Sheffield lifeboat leaves Poole and begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum. Though no longer at sea, the boat will continue to serve the RNLI by sharing its history, finding a new lease of life in an education role on display in the museum.

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

RNLI/Deirdre Mitchell

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

Since Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Kent named the Lifeboat City of Sheffield on 28 July 1989 at Whitby Lifeboat Station, she has also served at Ramsgate, Hartlepool and Sennen Cove before finding her permanent home at Poole in 2001. The Tyne Class Lifeboat remained at Poole Lifeboat Station until 2016, when she was withdrawn from service and replaced by a new D class lifeboat. But today, the City of Sheffield will leave Poole and be delivered to Sheffield as part of a loan to the National Emergency Services Museum, where she will be displayed for the next five years.

Once delivered, the City of Sheffield will be displayed in the National Emergency Services Museum and have an exhibition built around her to share stories of the boat’s remarkable service history with museum visitors. From 23 July, and throughout the school summer holidays, guided onboard tour sessions will run.

The museum will also work with local RNLI volunteers and South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue team to encourage people to consider the dangers at the coast and teach visitors vital water safety advice. This comes as part of the RNLI’s growing commitment to drowning prevention, seen as key to achieving the charity’s goal of halving drowning in the UK and Ireland by 2024.

The lifeboat was originally fundraised for by the people of Sheffield, with the cost being met by the 1987-88 Sheffield Lifeboat Appeal and a significant bequest from Mrs Mary Mable Walker. The loan provides the chance for the boat to go back to the city which made it possible while ensuring the RNLI can continue to support the museum in maintaining and displaying the vessel effectively.

Matt Wakefield, CEO of the museum said:

‘The Emergency Services Museum has a proud history of caring for historic emergency vehicles and we are delighted to be receiving a modern RNLI lifeboat to display – especially one with such a connection to the city. We’re looking forward to inviting the public to the exhibition and running sessions on the lifeboat’s remarkable stories and the inspiring people who served on her.’

Jonathan Clark, RNLI volunteer Coxswain of Poole lifeboat says:

‘The City of Sheffield was a faithful servant during her 15 years on service here at Poole lifeboat station; we are one of the busiest coastal stations so she was kept active. I was very proud to be the Coxswain at her wheel. Since September 2001 when she arrived on service, she launched 557 times, the number of people rescued (including lives saved) was 650. The Tyne was very much part of the Poole quay scenery and photographed a lot by the holiday makers.

‘In 2004, I had the proud honour of taking the wheel and escorting the RNLI’s patron, Her Majesty The Queen after she had opened the Lifeboat College and in December 2013 we celebrated the City of Sheffield’s 25th birthday with a special greeting sent by the Worshipful Mayor of Sheffield. We have a good few memories, memorable ‘shouts’ and the camaraderie part that the boat played within the crews and community life that revolves around a lifeboat station. It was a very sad day when she left us and she will always be a part of our heritage. However, I am very pleased that she will be returning home to South Yorkshire and look forward to visiting her there’.

David Welton, RNLI Heritage Manager adds: ‘This is an exciting move for the RNLI as the loan will not only teach people about the City of Sheffield’s wonderful past, but also how to stay safe by the water - all the more important in our inland cities, where communities are not always as familiar with the dangers they may find at the coast.

‘Lifeboats make the work of the RNLI possible, so we also hope that the chance to explore one will inspire some future lifeboat crew, who will continue the organisation’s legacy of saving lives at sea.


Notes to editors

  • The National Emergency Services Museum is planning an official unveiling event for the lifeboat and will invite the media and public later this summer.
  • For more information about the National Emergency Services Museum, please visit http://www.emergencymuseum.org.uk/index.html

RNLI media contacts

For more information, contact Geanie Cresswell on 01202 336507 / Geanie_Cresswell@rnli.org.uk or the RNLI Press Office on 01202 336789 / pressoffice@rnli.org.uk.

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

RNLI/Deirdre Mitchell

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.
Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

RNLI/Deirdre Mitchell

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.
Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

RNLI/Deirdre Mitchell

Retired City of Sheffield lifeboat begins her journey to the National Emergency Services Museum.

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland

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