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Moelfre RNLI lifeboat rescue Flossy the dog after a dramatic 40 metre cliff fall

Lifeboats News Release

Moelfre’s inshore lifeboat was tasked on Saturday evening to Porth Wen on the North Anglesey coast following reports of a small dog which had fallen over cliffs whilst out walking with its owners

The volunteer crew were tasked shortly after 5:30pm and Moelfre’s inshore lifeboat Enfys launched after reports were received from UK Coastguard – Holyhead that a small bichon frise dog had fallen over cliffs at Porth Wen near Bull Bay. Local Coastguard rescue teams from Cemaes and Holyhead were on scene and had located the dog in an isolated gulley at the bottom of the cliffs some 40 meters below. It was deemed evacuation by lifeboat would be the safest option.

The inshore lifeboat was quickly on-scene and was guided on to the location of the dog by the illumination provided from the Coastguard teams at the head of the cliffs. Once ashore, trainee helm Michael Hughes-Roberts, and Helm Vince Jones located dog Flossy, who appeared visibly shaken but miraculously un-injured after the dramatic fall. The crew used a blanket and hold-all to secure the dog and carried her back to the inshore lifeboat.

After a short passage back to Bull Bay, the volunteer lifeboat crew reunited Flossy with her concerned, but gratefully thankful owners. They explained that whilst enjoying an evening walk along the coastal path, Flossy had disappeared out of sight at the top of the cliffs. The couple were enjoying what they described as a ‘peaceful mobile phone free’ walk which meant they had to endure a 20 minute run to a local farm house to raise the alarm, when they realised Flossy was in trouble.

Vince Jones – Station mechanic and helm at Moelfre said

‘Tonight’s rescue had a great outcome. Working closely with our local Coastguard rescue teams, again resulted in a quick and successful outcome for Flossy and her owners. Flossy was extremely lucky to have come away unscathed from the fall, although she wasn’t too keen on our crews in their bright yellow dry-suits!’

Flossy the rescued dog

RNLI/Vince Jones

Flossy the Dog located in darkness at the foot of the cliffs
Flossy the dog reunited

RNLI/Vince Jones

Flossy reunited with her owners
Cliffs at Porth Wen

RNLI/Vince Jones

The Cliffs at Porth Wen where Flossy had gone missing

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

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The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland