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Seal pup interrupts Redcar lifeboat operations

Lifeboats News Release

Redcar RNLI volunteers had routine operations interrupted on Thursday 27 April 2017 when a member of the public alerted them to a young seal which had been found sheltering from North Sea storms on the steps of a seaside apartment block.

Trainee RNLI crew member Steve Atkinson was on his way to the lifeboat station for a lifeboat exchange when a member of the public pointed out the seal, perched at the top of the steps leading to the doorway of the Royal Esplanade Apartments. The pup had already started to attract a number of onlookers and was preventing residents of the apartments from leaving.

Steve Atkinson said; ‘I have only been a trainee for a few months so I wasn’t sure how we dealt with this sort of thing. The lifeboat operations manager contacted the British Divers Marine Life Rescue organisation, but they didn’t have anybody available to collect the seal’.

As the RNLI crew were making alternative arrangements, an off-duty coastguard officer who runs a local pet shop passed the scene in their van, which had a dog cage in it.

The seal was coaxed into the cage and then carried across the main road along the sea front and onto the beach.

Once the door of the cage was opened, the seal quickly made its escape and happily made its way into the sea and disappeared under the waves.

Dave Cocks, RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager at Redcar said: ‘ It’s very common for seals to come ashore during rough weather, but this one decided to go just a bit too far for its own good really.

‘It had managed to get itself up a slipway, across the Esplanade and then up the stairs of the apartments.

‘It was quite happy where it was, but the residents weren’t so pleased. Every time they tried to open the door to leave, the seal was snarling and baring its teeth.

‘When the coastguard officer arrived with the dog cage, the rest was easy. The seal didn’t need much persuading to get into the cage.

‘The crew were helped by members of the public to carry the cage back down onto the beach, and as soon as the door was opened it seemed to be very pleased to be going back where it belonged.

‘It even seemed to take a couple of glances back towards us to say “thanks”.’

If a member of the public finds a seal, whale or dolphin on the beach they should not approach the animal. Instead they should inform UK Coastguard and contact the British Divers Marine Life Rescue service on 07787433412.


Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

RNLI/Dave Cocks

Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway
Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

RNLI/Dave Cocks

Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway
Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

RNLI/Dave Cocks

Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway
Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

RNLI/Dave Cocks

Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway
Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

RNLI/Dave Cocks

Redcar RNLI rescue seal pup stranded in apartment doorway

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

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Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland

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