Looe RNLI lifeboat crew’s afternoon sailing plans interrupted by a multi agency

Lifeboats News Release

Looe RNLI’s inshore lifeboats were launched within six minutes on Saturday afternoon, 22 April 2017, to reports of a person stuck on cliffs to the East of Downderry

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry

In a multi-agency rescue the casualty was winched down to the beach below. As the HM Coastguard helicopter was unable to land on this beach, the casualty was transferred by inshore lifeboat to Seaton beach where the helicopter landed to take the casualty to hospital.

Many of Looe RNLI’s volunteer crew were getting ready on Looe seafront for Saturday afternoon’s sailing when their plans were interrupted by pagers sounding at 1.46 pm, following reports of a person stuck on cliffs to the East of Downderry. With a quick dash to the lifeboat station next door, both of the charity’s inshore lifeboats launched within six minutes and headed across Looe bay. Looe, Tamar and Plymouth Mountbatten Coastguard teams also responded along with the HM Coastguard helicopter based in Newquay.

Standing by offshore the lifeboats spotted the casualty 40’ up the cliff. In a difficult winching operation due to overhanging rocks and an area of loose soil due to a recent land slip the casualty was lowered to the beach below. As the helicopter was unable to land on this beach a decision was made to transfer the casualty by the Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat to Seaton beach where the coastguard teams prepared a safe landing area. The casualty was transferred to the helicopter and flown to hospital.

The Atlantic 85 and D Class inshore lifeboats returned to Looe Lifeboat Station where they were washed down and refuelled ready to go back on service at 3.30 pm.

Looe Lifeboat station recommend when you are on the coast to always carry a mobile phone, check the tide times and tell someone where you are going and what time you expect to return. If you get cut off by the tide do not take any risks by attempting to climb the cliffs.

Atlantic 85 crew: David Jackman (helm), Brian Bowdler, Ben Crabb and Dale Staff

D Class crew: Matthew Jaycock, Richard Porter and Robert Deakin

END

Notes to editors

· Picture -

Looe RNLI Atlantic 85 Sheila and Dennis Tongue II leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· Picture -
Looe RNLI D Class Ollie Naismith leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry
credit RNLI / Ian Foster

· For further information on Looe RNLI Lifeboats please visit our website www.looelifeboats.co.uk


RNLI media contacts

For more information please telephone Ian Foster, RNLI Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer for Looe Lifeboat Station, on 07902 753228 or looelpo@ianfoster.com or ian_foster@rnli.org.uk

or

Amy Caldwell, RNLI Public Relations Manager, on 07920 818807 or amy_caldwell@rnli.org.uk

or

Emma Haines, RNLI Press Officer, on 07786 668847 or emma_haines@rnli.org.uk

Alternatively you can contact the RNLI Duty Press Officer on 01202 336789
Looe RNLI D Class Ollie Naismith leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry

RNLI/Ian Foster

Looe RNLI D Class Ollie Naismith leaving Looe river and heading towards Downderry

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The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

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