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Criccieth RNLI Lifeboat attends to three vessels during one launch

Lifeboats News Release

At 8.45am on Saturday, 4 June 2016 volunteer crew members from Criccieth’s RNLI Lifeboat Station were tasked to assist a yacht that was taking on water near Shell Island.

The station’s Atlantic 85 Lifeboat, Doris Joan, made towards the casualty vessel, Galatea, which was heading towards Mochras Lagoon.  The yacht, which being escorted by a fishing boat by the time the Lifeboat was on scene, was handed to the care of the Lifeboat crew and shepherded to the safety of the lagoon.  

As the Lifeboat was leaving the lagoon, she came across a 10-foot dory at the lagoon entrance.  The boat’s engine had failed and it was being swept out to sea on a fast flowing ebbing tide. The Lifeboat took her in tow. The person on board the dory informed the Lifeboat crew that he was returning from assisting a yacht he had recently sold and was concerned about her crew as they were inexperienced.  After making repeated attempts to contact the yacht’s reportedly inexperienced crew, it became apparent that the Lifeboat would be required to search for the vessel and ensure it’s crew’s wellbeing. 

The Lifeboat’s crew searched for the yacht, Dina Dow, near Mochras before searching further south, towards Barmouth.  Shortly after 10.00am the Lifeboat located the yacht, which was broken down and drifting.  The Lifeboat placed a crewmember aboard to manage the stricken vessel.  Given the number of other vessels at sea in the Tremadog Bay area, it was decided to call upon Barmouth’s RNLI inshore rescue boat to tow the yacht to Barmouth – this enabled Criccieth’s Lifeboat to remain in bay should it be required to respond to further incidents. 

 

Following the Lifeboat’s return to Criccieth, the station’s Lifeboat Operation Manager, Peter Williams stated ‘It’s commendable that the Lifeboat’s Crew adapted to a dynamic situation.  Their job would have been less worrying had those on-board the stricken vessels requiring our service, been wearing life jackets.  I would urge all those taking to sea to ensure they have life jackets for themselves and every passenger on board and to make use of them accordingly.’             

 

ENDS

For further information Ifer Gwyn 07554445316

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland