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Barrow Lifeboat Rescues Man from Capsized Dingy in Walney Channel

Lifeboats News Release

Volunteer crew from the RNLI’s Barrow station launched both their inshore and all-weather lifeboats late last night to search for a man who had been reported as missing in the sea off Piel Island.

The request to launch the lifeboat came from Holyhead Coastguard at 10-53pm yesterday evening. The information received was that a man had been using a dingy as a tender boat between his yacht, which was moored in Pile Bight, and Piel Island. His friend, safely on Piel Island, raised the alarm when the man failed to return from his yacht to Piel after some 20 minutes. The lifeboat crew were paged and at 11-05pm the inshore lifeboat, Vision of Tamworth, was launched crewed by Dave Kell at the helm and assisted by Matthew Tippins.

The inshore lifeboat made an initial search to locate the yacht and having done so established that there was nobody on board and no sign of the dingy. The decision was then taken to launch the all-weather lifeboat, Grace Dixon, to assist with the search and she was launched at 11-20pm under the command of Shaun Charnley with a full crew on board. At the time, there was a moderate breeze with a strong incoming tide running, high water being at 1.20 am (Sunday) with a predicted height of 8.9 metres. Based on this information, the crew of the inshore lifeboat decided to search further along Walney Channel heading towards Barrow. 

At 11-25pm the crew of the inshore lifeboat located the man in the vicinity of No.6 Buoy on the west side of Walney Channel. His inflatable dingy had capsized whilst he was in Piel Chanel and he was thrown into the water. The man, who was wearing a life-jacket, had spent several minutes in the water before managing to climb onto the upturned dingy. He had attempted to row to safety but the incoming tide was too strong to enable him to make any progress and the current had carried him along the Channel. 

The casualty, a man from Lancaster, was transferred to the inshore lifeboat and he was then brought back to the lifeboat station arriving at approximately 11-40pm. An ambulance was called to take the casualty to Furness General Hospital. However, after having been given dry clothing and hot drinks by the lifeboat crew, the ambulance crew assessed the casualty as well enough to proceed home.

The Vision of Tamworth was stood down at 11-55pm but the Grace Dixon remained afloat whilst communication with the Coastguard continued in order to confirm that there were no other persons in danger. The man on Piel Island who had raised the alarm was kindly offered shelter there for the night by the landlord of the Ship Inn. 

Both lifeboats were re-housed by 1-00am and were made ready for the next launch.

Notes to editors
Barrow lifeboat station has been operating since 1864. To learn more about the lifeboat station go to www.rnli.org.uk/barrow
 
RNLI  contacts
For more information please telephone Chris Clouter, RNLI Lifeboat Press Officer at Barrow on 07531 085900, or Alison Levett, Public Relations Manager, North, on 07786-668912, or online at alison_levett@rnli.org.uk or contact RNLI Public Relations on 01202 336789

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

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Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland

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