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Criccieth RNLI lifeboat Annual Open Meeting reaffirms community support

Lifeboats News Release

On the evening of Tuesday the 19th of April, 2016 station branch officials, volunteer crew members and fundraisers gathered at Criccieth’s RNLI lifeboat station to convene their Annual Open Meeting.

This year’s meeting was again very well attended and demonstrated the support provided to the station and the charity by the people of Criccieth. During the meeting four station officials were reappointed to their posts, namely, Dr. E Tudor Jones as Chairman, Mr. Robert M Roberts as President, Mrs. Carol Emery and Ken Roberts as Vice Presidents respectively. During his opening remarks, the Chairman noted the high regard given to the station locally and by the RNLI nationally, stating that it operated well due to the efforts of all those associated with the station.  These sentiments were furthered by the RNLI’s Divisional Operations Director, Mr. Lee Firman.  He stated that the station was an exemplar within the organisation and a pleasure to work with.

The meeting accepted the Lifeboat Operation Manager’s Annual Report for the previous year. The report included details of all launches and rescues undertaken by the station during 2015. In total, the station responded to 22 calls – this was less than 2016.  This reduction was been part of a national trend, largely attributed to the poor weather witnessed during the summer.  As part of the annual Report, it was also noted that two of the Station’s crewmembers, David O’Neill and David Johnson, had successfully passed as Helmsmen and that Hope Filby had been appointed as Community Safety Officer for the Station.

On behalf of Station’s shop’s volunteers, Angie Perry stated that the shop had sold £229,477.15 of goods over the past 5 years.  These takings, less the costs of purchasing stock, were noted as being of immense value to the Station and the charity.      

Following the meeting, the station’s Lifeboat Operations Manager, Peter L. Williams noted “Once again this year it was a pleasure to see so many people attend the meeting. It’s the combined efforts of station officials, crewmembers and fundraisers that allows us to continue saving lives at sea, and I am truly grateful for their continued support. In addition to the formalities associated with such meetings, the AGM is also a celebration of what’s been achieved during the previous year.”


ENDS

For further information, please contact Ifer Gwyn on 07554445316

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Ireland from 238 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 240 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI - public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number 20003326 in the Republic of Ireland

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