Station history

When the station was formed at Dungarvan it completed a chain of seven lifeboat stations which the Institution had established on the south coast of Ireland within a period of two years; prior to this, this part of the coast was totally unprotected.

1832

Silver Medal to Lt Charles Autridge RN for a service to the Brig Cyclops that ran aground in strong westerly winds and a heavy running sea at Doonbeg on 21 December 1831.  The brig was discovered at daybreak with her foremast and bowsprit gone, waterlogged, and with he crew in the rigging.  Lt Autridge launched his gig with a crew of five coastguardmen and pulled for three hours before he succeeded in reaching the brig which he found to be a complete wreck, with the sea breaching right over her.  At the third attempt he managed to get alongside and took off seven men and two boys.  Unfortunately the Master had been washed overboard and the Carpenter had died in the rigging.

1852

On 24 April a shore boat manned with nine people put off to the assistance of the brig Harry King, but on returning to the shore capsized and eight members of her crew of nine drowned.  Committee of Management voted £20 to local fund, for the widows and families of Captain Maurice Duggan, Michael Raher, Maurice Mulcahy, Thomas McNamara, John Whelan, Thomas Crawford, John Maher and Laurence Lenihan.

1859

Lifeboat house constructed at a cost of £126.

1861

Silver Medals awarded to Robert Barron and Captain Augustine Dower in connection with the wreck of the brig Susan of Cork at Ballinacourty, in a south west gale on 19 February.  The lifeboat did not render any assistance although she was launched, but a shore boat put out and rescued two out of the crew of six.

1863

Lifeboat house removed to Ballinacourty.

1895

Michael Hogan died from the effects of a service.

1896

Committee of Management voted £100 to widow of Michael Hogan who died on 29 January 1896 and whose death was attributed to exposure on service on 29 December 1895.

1897

The Thanks of the Institution inscribed on Vellum was accorded to Captain John Veale in acknowledgement of his valuable services in acting as coxswain of the Dungarvan lifeboat William Dunville on 24 December 1896 and succeeded in rescuing seven of the crew of the ship Moresby, which was totally wrecked in a very strong gale and heavy seas.  Two of the rescued men died soon after reaching the shore, and 18 others unhappily perished.

1899

Lifeboat house and slipway constructed on a new site on south side of Dungarvan Bay at Crowe Point at a cost of £1,800 and station called Dungarvan Bay (Helvick Head).

1903

Station named Helvick Head (Dungarvan Bay).

1959

Centenary Vellum awarded to station.

1969

Committee of Management decided to withdraw lifeboat from Helvick Head on 25 March.

1995

At a meeting of the Executive Committee held on 28 June it was agreed that subject to satisfactory launching and recovery trials, the lifeboat station at Helvick Head be re-established, operating a B class lifeboat.

1997

An Atlantic 21 class lifeboat was placed on service on 26 April.

1999

The new Atlantic 75 lifeboat B-760 Alice & Charles was placed on service on 14 December.  This lifeboat was funded from the generous bequest of Charles William Armstrong.  B553 has been withdrawn to ILC Cowes

2013

The Atlantic 75 lifeboat B-753 City of Bradford V was moved from Baltimore to Helvick Head.

2014

The new Atlantic 75 lifeboat B-874 Robert Armstrong was placed on service on 31 August. This lifeboat was funded by the generous bequest of Mr Robert David Armstrong. Lifeboat B-753 City of Bradford V has been withdrawn.